Chloe
Organic Massage & Bodywork Studio

Frequently Asked Questions

Where will my massage or bodywork session take place?
Must I be completely undressed?
Will the practitioner be present when I disrobe?
Will I be covered during the session?
What parts of my body will be massaged?
What will the massage or bodywork feel like?
Are there different kinds of massage and bodywork?
What should I do during the massage or bodywork session?
How will I feel after the massage or bodywork session?
What are the benefits of massage and bodywork?
Are there any medical conditions that would make massage or bodywork inadvisable?

Where will my massage or bodywork session take place?
Your massage or bodywork session will take place in a warm, comfortable, quiet room. Soft music may be played to help you relax. You will lie on a table especially designed for your comfort.

Must I be completely undressed?
Most massage and bodywork techniques are traditionally performed with the client unclothed; however, it is entirely up to you what you want to wear. You should undress to your level of comfort. You will be properly draped during the entire session.

Will the practitioner be present when I disrobe?
The practitioner will leave the room while you undress, relax onto the table, and cover yourself with a clean sheet and a blanket for warmth if needed.

Will I be covered during the session?
You will be properly draped at all times to keep you warm and comfortable. Only the area being worked on will be exposed.

What parts of my body will be massaged?
A typical full-body session will include work on your back, arms, legs, feet, hands, head, neck, and shoulders.

What will the massage or bodywork feel like?
A relaxing Swedish massage is often a baseline for clients. In a general Swedish massage, your session may start with broad, flowing strokes that will help calm your nervous system and relax exterior muscle tension. As your body becomes relaxed, pressure will gradually be increased to relax specific areas and relieve areas of muscular tension. Often, a light oil or lotion is used to allow your muscles to be massaged without causing excessive friction to the skin. The oil also helps hydrate your skin. You should communicate immediately if you feel any discomfort so that another approach may be taken. Massage and bodywork are most effective when your body is not resisting.

Are there different kinds of massage and bodywork?
There are numerous types of massage and bodywork; various techniques utilize different strokes, including basic rubbing strokes, rocking movement, posture and movement re-education, application of pressure to specific points, and more. We can discuss which methods may be most appropriate for you.

What should I do during the massage or bodywork session?
Prior to the massage, feel free to ask the practitioner any questions about the technique or the upcoming session. During the massage, make yourself comfortable. The practitioner will either gently move you or tell you what is needed throughout the session (such as lifting your arm). Many people just close their eyes and completely relax, communicating if/when they need more or less pressure, another blanket, or anything else relevant to the session. If you have any questions regarding the session or about the particular technique you are receiving, feel free to ask.

How will I feel after the massage or bodywork session?
Most people feel very relaxed. Some experience freedom from long-term aches and pains developed from tension or repetitive activity. After an initial period of feeling slowed down, people often experience increased energy, heightened awareness, and greater productivity which can last for days. Since toxins are released from your soft tissues during a massage, it is recommended you drink plenty of water following your massage.

What are the benefits of massage and bodywork?
Massage and bodywork can help release chronic muscular tension and pain, improve circulation, increase joint flexibility, reduce mental and physical fatigue and stress, promote faster healing of injured muscular tissue, improve posture, and reduce blood pressure. Massage and bodywork is also known to promote better sleep, improve concentration, reduce anxiety and create an overall sense of well-being. For more info visit The Benefits of Massage and Bodywork section.

Are there any medical conditions that would make massage or bodywork inadvisable?
Yes. That's why it's imperative that, before you begin your session, the practitioner asks general health questions. It is very important that you inform the practitioner of any health problems or medications you are taking. If you are under a doctor's care, it is strongly advised that you receive a written recommendation for massage or bodywork prior to any session. Depending on the condition, approval from your doctor may be required.


How often should I get a massage?

Why are you coming for treatment? For example, is this for a specific issue, or is it for relaxation?

Acute injury – more frequent treatments of shorter duration should help – for example, 2 times a week for 30 – 45 minutes. This should help relieve pain and congestion in the area, then after a few weeks, switch to deeper, muscular work for longer periods of time. At this point your injury may have moved into a subacute or chronic stage of healing, depending on the severity of the injury, 1-2 times a week for an hour, over a period of 3-4 weeks should get you on the road to recovery.

Treatment for chronic conditions (i.e. headaches or back pain) – one hour twice a week for 4 treatments, then try once a week for 3 or 4 weeks, and try to decrease to 1x in 14 days for 2 treatments. You will then go into maintenance mode. Once again, very individual, and the longer the condition has been an issue for the client, the more treatments will usually be needed to make consistent gains.

Some more general guidelines:

Follow remedial exercise and homecare advice – passive treatments such as massage therapy can only take you so far, it is YOUR responsibility to be proactive in your own health care. This means follow exercise, stress management, nutrition and lifestyle advice. Record what you do and how you feel, try to make a correlation between various factors. If you have a team of health care providers who are willing to work together, use them!

Don’t go too long between treatments! Progress made during a treatment is building on the progress made in a prior treatment. This means that if I’ve treated a client for chronic back pain for a month and we’re seeing some results, if he stretches out the length of time between appointments to 8 weeks instead of my recommended 2 – 4 weeks, it may be like starting all over again. What a waste of money for the client!

Remember, though, that if you start to feel consistently better (and consistent is key), you have the right to say “I’d like to stretch out the time between treatments a few more days, can we try that?” Your therapist can only give you advice and guidance, you have to figure things out what works for your situation.

treatments which focus on specific issues are usually more frequent, though I rarely have treated a client more than 2 times a week for more than 3 or 4 weeks.

- for relaxation and general health purposes, more than once a month is not necessary unless you have the time and financial resources to get treated.

- if you have a chronic, long-standing issue, and the tissue is very “dense” or “hard”, then you may need several treatments over a few weeks to make progress. Once your tissue has loosened up a bit, you should start feeling better. After a few weeks, your therapist should see how you are progressing, and you should be given the option of reducing treatment frequency.

What is the tissue presenting?

- tissue that is inflamed from injury cannot be treated directly with massage therapy, however, surrounding and compensating structures can and should be addressed to prevent pain and muscle imbalance.

- tissue that is inflamed from injury can be treated with Manual Lymph Drainage (also known as lymphatic drainage or mld). Frequent treatments of this nature are recommended as this therapy facilitates the removal of metabolic waste from the injury and relieves pain and congestion.

Keeping in mind that everyone is individual and responds differently to treatment, you may notice that the effects of the treatment last only a day or so after the first treatment, with longer periods of feeling better as you progress – this is when your therapist should reduce treatment frequency. After all, how are you going to know that you’re feeling better if you are still getting treatments twice a week? Exactly …

After 3 treatments, how are you feeling?

- Personally, even with chronic issues such as upper back pain and tension, I feel that aclient should notice an improvement by the end of the 3rd treatment. This is my guideline which tells me I am on the right track, and it keeps me focused on what the client needs. I’m not saying there should be a huge or remarkable improvement, but some progress should have been made.

Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals
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